Monday, February 6, 2017

Week 3 :Asian Horror:Vengeful Spirits (A Wild Sheep Chase by Haruki Murakami)

Prompt: 
Do the assumptions of the work—the nature or even the existence of good and evil for instance—reflect a different cultural orientation than that expressed in "western" horror or the gothic? In what specific ways do the assumptions seem to differ? Post a comment on another student's blog.



     Initially when it was proposed that we read J-horror I expected there to be some sort of similarity of their genre to that of western horror aesthetic. Obviously the lore is different in their culture and so the myths and monsters would be more tailored to what their culture would deem scary but there would be the common core of anything scary. There the unknown, the paranormal / supernatural, the dead, and of course; nature.  Just to expand on the paranormal / supernatural; those things would cover religious ideologies such as possessions and demonic forces. Although there are all of these factors that they could choose from, their leading quality is ambiguity. It usually takes either of two courses, one would be paranormal route, following a pretty linear plot line. Secondly would be the completely ambiguous story line, where the entire thing is disjointed and relies heavily on the thematic concern.  Over all both ends of the spectrum heavily rely on giving back story on why the characters are there, what has driven them to that point, character development and so on. What they end up doing is leaving the outcome of interactions for the audience to assume, while western films are bent on letting you know why the character is going to receive the treatment that they’re getting.  After reading “a wild sheep chase” I noticed that the same format is used , all the back story is given as to why the character is the way they are and a very vague sense of action . To be completely honest I prefer this format over that of western movies who rely too heavily on the physical characteristics of horror. Western films start to become repetitive and predictable because they all are just sort of remakes of each other, and don’t even get me started on how horribly rendered their remakes are of other cultures horror movies.

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